Category: Cybersecurity

layers of the internetThere are more than one billion web pages on the Internet, and 4.8 billion people around the world use the Internet daily. But did you know that only 10% of websites on the Internet are indexed by Google, Yahoo, Bing, and other search engines and accessible to the general public? These websites are called the “surface web,” and the other 90% of websites are the “deep and dark web.” These are the layers of the Internet.

Think of the internet as the ocean, with the surface web as the top layer and visible for miles and miles. The deep web, then, is the deeper part of the ocean just below the surface. This is also accessible to people but requires a bit of work to access. The dark web is the very bottom of the ocean and is only accessible to a small number of people who know exactly how to get there and has the resources and time to do it.

Let’s take a look at what kinds of web pages are on each layer (surface, deep, and dark), and what that means to the general Internet user.

Easily Accessible Content

What is the Surface Web?

The surface web includes websites that we are all familiar with and likely access on a daily basis. This is the portion of the Internet that is readily available to the general public and searchable with standard web search engines like Google, Bing, and Yahoo. The surface web is also known as the “Visible Web.”

The surface web includes websites like:

  • Social media sites including Facebook and Instagram
  • Business websites such as Everound.com
  • Wikipedia
  • Online video sharing platforms like YouTube

Essentially, any website that appears after you complete a search on Google or another search engine is on the surface web.

Accessed Through Authentication

What is the Deep Web?

Unlike the surface web, the deep web is part of the Internet where the contents are not indexed by search engines. The deep web is only accessible with some sort of authentication – a password or other means to be able to view the data and information. Using the previous ocean analogy, a person needs to have a resource to go “below the surface.”

Why is information on the deep web harder to access? Without authentication, that information is at risk for public consumption.

The deep web contains sensitive information like:

  • Personal email accounts
  • Content on your social media accounts
  • Online banking and investments
  • Private online databases
  • Medical records and private health information
  • Content contained within scientific and academic databases.

A lot of what exists on the deep web consists of personal information that you wouldn’t want to turn up in a web search — like your social security number or credit card information. This is private and could be misused in a data breach.

Remember, if you must provide a username, password, or some other type of authentication, the information you access is on the deep web.

Intentionally Hidden on the Internet

What is the Dark Web?

The dark web IS a part of the deep web but cannot be accessed through traditional web browsers. The dark web is intentionally hidden on the Internet. Originally designed to share information and communicate by the US Military, the dark web is now accessed by others.

Accessing the dark web is not an easy task for the general Internet user. Regular browsers like Microsoft Edge or Google Chrome are unable to access dark web websites. The dark web uses what’s called The Onion Router (often referred to as Tor) hidden service protocol. “Tor” servers are undetectable from search engines and provide complete anonymity.

Although not all activity on the dark web is harmful, there is a growing population of cybercriminals that use the dark web maliciously and for illicit purposes. Some cybercriminals sell sensitive information on the dark web that can be used to exploit companies and can lead to identity theft. The dark web also is a place where some cyber attacks are planned.

Here are a few examples of what can be found on the dark web:

  • Stolen information: If a company experiences a data breach because of a cybersecurity failure, there’s a chance the stolen data may be up for grabs on the dark web. Other stolen information for sale includes login credentials and hacked Netflix and Amazon accounts.
  • Illicit substances: Believe it or not, you can find and purchase illicit drugs and toxic chemicals on the dark web. Prescription drugs are also available on the dark web.
  • Dangerous and disturbing images and information: Unfortunately, the dark web can be a dangerous and ugly place. Human trafficking, pornography, gore, and counterfeit goods have found a home on the dark web.

The dark web can be a marketplace for illegal behavior. Companies with a cybersecurity plan in place that includes dark web monitoring can stay ahead of cybercrime on the dark web. Employee information can be at risk – logins and passwords are prime data that can be sold and transferred on the dark web.

Website hackers, too, find ways to compromise company networks through the dark web. A dark web monitoring MSP (managed service provider) can help you keep track of any information that may be compromised.

Protecting Your Data and Organization

Cybersecurity and Dark Web Monitoring with Everound

As a cybersecurity expert, Everound can help monitor the dark web for your small business or corporate enterprise. Through a strategic, customized and intentional approach, our team of cyber experts will create a cybersecurity dark web monitoring protocol that includes:

  • Real-time alerts of dark web threats
  • Routine scan of dark web for your business information
  • Detection of compromised credentials including IP addresses, email addresses, and logins and passwords

Cybersecurity companies like Everound are experts at preventing cyber threats from infiltrating your business. With more than 30 years of experience, our team of cybersecurity professionals can recommend and implement data protection strategies and programs to help keep your information and your network safe from harm. Reach out today for your free cybersecurity risk assessment. We focus on IT so you can focus on your business.

In today’s highly volatile cyber environment, it’s important for business owners to have a clear, strategic approach to a cybersecurity risk management process. Managing cyber risk should be considered a priority for all business owners, regardless of size. While most media coverage focuses on cyber-attacks for large enterprise-level organizations, many small and medium businesses are also facing cyber-attack challenges.

Cyber-attacks are not random. In fact, if you know what to look for, there are usually signs of a planned or imminent cyber threat. Phishing emails and mentions of organizations on the dark web are both red flags that an organization is being targeted.

What should business owners do to stay ahead of potential cybersecurity vulnerabilities? The answer is the creation and implementation of a cybersecurity risk management plan. A cybersecurity risk management plan is the ongoing process of identifying, analyzing, evaluating, and addressing cybersecurity threats. The process is shared among an entire organization, not just members of the information technology team.

Because the cyber landscape is continually changing and new, sophisticated threats emerge daily, a risk management plan doesn’t completely provide a fail-safe for cyber threats. However, by establishing a risk management approach to cybersecurity, an organization can greatly reduce its risk by attending to the flaws, threat trends, and attacks that matter most to its business.

Let’s take a look at how to develop a cybersecurity risk management plan, the common cyber risk management frameworks, and the benefits of cybersecurity risk management.

Prepare Now. Save Later.

Developing a Cybersecurity Risk Management Plan

When developing a cybersecurity risk management plan, many organizations approach the process with a 4-step model. First, organizations should identify risk, then assess the likelihood of the threat or risk actually occurring and what is its potential impact. The third step is to identify appropriate risk mitigation measures, and the final step is an ongoing monitoring program that includes risk response and security controls designed to evolve to address a shifting cyber threat environment.

Let’s explore each step of the process in more detail.

Step One: Identify Cybersecurity Risk

An IT risk is essentially any threat to your business data, IT infrastructure systems, and overall business processes. It is the potential for an unplanned, negative business outcome that comes as a result of a failure or misuse of information technology. When considering what your IT risks are, think of how a threat can impact your business and what would the consequences be?

When identifying risk, start with thinking about the threats, vulnerabilities, and consequences of an IT failure. Document each before moving to the next step.

  • Threats: Threats are circumstances with the potential to affect an organization’s operations or IT assets negatively. This can occur through unauthorized access to IT information systems and can occur through human error, cyber-attacks, IT configuration failures, and even natural disasters such as a hurricane, tropical storm, or black out.
  • Vulnerabilities: What are the weaknesses in the information system, security procedures, internal controls or implementation from a threat? In addition to internal vulnerabilities, list the external weak points such as supply chains and vendor relationships.
  • Consequences: Consequences are any of the adverse results that happen when a threat exploits a vulnerability. What costs – both hard and soft – are at risk and would be a consequence if a cyber threat was successful? Some of the costs include revenue, destroyed or lost information, and customer trust.

Step Two: How to Assess Risk

After cybersecurity risks are identified and documented, the next step is to assess your level of risk to determine what level of cybersecurity measures should be implemented. Which risks are the greatest? Which have low consequences? Assessing risk can help you determine how to build your risk management plan.

For reach risk, conduct an impact analysis that includes:

  • Name all assets
  • Prioritize each asset
  • Identify all possible threats
  • Identify vulnerabilities
  • Determine the likelihood of a threat event
  • Conduct an impact analysis to estimate the cost impact

The results of your risk assessment will be a guide to inform risk management decisions and risk response measures in the future.

Step Three: Identify and Implement Cybersecurity Risk Mitigation Measures

Now that you’ve intentionally identified IT risks, how can you mitigate each risk to minimize the impact of a cyber-attack? Depending on the outcome of the previous steps, there are several options to help manage cybersecurity risk including:

  • Cybersecurity training: Most successful cyber-attacks are the result of human error. Cybersecurity training programs for staff and stakeholders is a great tool to help mitigate risk.
  • Updating software: Updating software is an important part of cybersecurity. Outdated software lacks patches if vulnerabilities are discovered and can fall prey to advanced cyberattacks. This poses several security risks, both due to human malice and the chances of information system failure.
  • Multi-factor authentication (MFA): MFA is a security feature that dramatically improves account security. MFA, also referred to as two-factor authentication, adds an additional layer of security to protect organizational data and assets.
  • Data backup: Data backups are an essential part of a cybersecurity risk management plan as they allow for data protection and recovery in the case of a successful attack. There are different strategies and resources available for data backup, most including cloud services.
  • Endpoint protection:  Every single device that is connected to your network is an entry point to your business. Endpoint protection works by examining files as they enter and leave devices on your network. An endpoint security system is a software program that is centrally managed by an administrator and tracks threats in real-time.
  • Dark web monitoring: Company email addresses, validation credentials, account information, and other important business data can be compromised or sold on the dark web. Adding a dark web monitoring service to your cybersecurity plan helps protect yourself from a data breach.

Step Four: Implement Ongoing Monitoring

After putting cybersecurity risk mitigation measures in place, most business owners have a false sense of security. After all, they’ve identified risks and put security measures in place – shouldn’t that be enough?

Unfortunately, cybercriminals and cybercrime evolves and change rapidly. Ongoing monitoring can help ensure internal controls keep up with changing IT risks.

Best Practices

Common Cyber Risk Management Frameworks

When building a cyber risk management process, there are several frameworks that help businesses adhere to industry and regulatory best practices. A cybersecurity framework provides a common language and set of standards for IT professionals in varying industries. Having a framework in place makes it easier to define the processes and procedures your business must take for cybersecurity.

Some of the most popular frameworks include:

  • NIST Cybersecurity Framework (CSF): Drafted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), this framework addresses the lack of standards when it comes to cybersecurity across the private and public sectors. NIST CSF provides a uniform set of rules, guidelines, and standards for organizations to use across industries.
  • DoD Risk Management Framework (RMF): The Department of Defense (DoD) Risk Management Framework (RMF) is the set of standards that DoD agencies use to assess and manage cybersecurity risks. This framework can be applied to other industries and breaks down a cyber risk management strategy into six steps.
  • ISO/IEC 27001 and 27002: Created by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), ISO 27001 and ISO 27002 are considered the international standards for validating a cybersecurity program. Companies can receive ISO certification by following the framework outlined.
  • FAIR: The Factor Analysis of Information Risk (FAIR) is a cyber risk framework developed by The Open Group to help businesses understand, measure, and analyze risk to help business leaders make well-informed decisions about their business risk and their cybersecurity practices.
Stay Ahead of Cybercrime

Benefits of Cybersecurity Risk Management

An intentional and strategic cybersecurity risk management program can reduce the risk of cyber criminals obtaining sensitive company information. There are countless benefits to a thought-out, intentional approach to cybersecurity including:

  • Phishing detection
  • Brand protection
  • Fraud protection
  • Sensitive data leak monitoring
  • Dark web activity
  • Automated threat mitigation
  • Minimizing supply chain risks

Unsure where to start with a cybersecurity risk management plan? A managed services provider (MSP) specializing in cybersecurity can help you create a framework to protect your business from cyberthreats.

Protecting Your Data and Organization

Cybersecurity Risk Assessment with Everound

Cybersecurity companies like Everound are experts at preventing cyber threats from infiltrating your business. With more than 30 years of experience, our team of cybersecurity professionals can recommend and implement data protection strategies and programs to help keep your information and your network safe from harm.

We offer a free cybersecurity risk assessment that can help you start developing your cybersecurity risk management program. We will take a deep dive into your potential security threats and recommend programs that can help you reduce risk. Reach out today for a free consultation. We focus on your IT, so you can focus on your business.

Ransomware attacks are on the rise and are making national and global news headlines and for good cause. In 2020, there was a 150% increase in attacks and a 300% increase in the amount of ransom paid. This increase does not appear to be slowing down either. To date, the amount of ransomware attacks in 2021 has surpassed all of last year. What is contributing to this increase?

While there are several factors that have contributed to the increase, one main reason was the immediate shift to remote work during 2020. Almost overnight, many businesses went 100% remote without a cybersecurity plan in place. Workers were utilizing their personal computers and laptops and logging on from home on unsecured VPN networks rather than connecting at the office through a secure network. Cybercriminals were able to exploit security weaknesses at both large and small businesses.

Do you know your risk for a ransomware attack at your business? Let’s take a look at how ransomware attacks have changed, who is at risk for an attack, and ways to reduce your risk.

More Sophisticated Attacks

How Ransomware Attacks Have Changed

When you think of a ransomware attack, you may think of a lone person sitting in a dark basement hacking into a company’s network trying to gain access to sensitive information. The hacker gains access to the company through phishing emails and once in the network, deploys malware that encrypts servers and sensitive company data. While this methodology still occurs, the entire process has evolved, is more organized, and is a massive, profitable business.

While there are still ‘lone wolves’ executing ransomware attacks, most data breaches occur at the hands of a group of sophisticated, strategic cybercriminals. These organizations, usually located in eastern Europe, are extraordinarily adept at infiltrating a company’s servers and planting ransomware. They extract as much sensitive company information as possible in order to demand ransom payments.

Another factor in the increase of ransomware attacks is ransomware-as-a-service (RaaS). Think of RaaS as a franchise model for ransomware attacks. Large-scale, organized groups of cyber criminals, such as DarkSide and REvil, franchise their capabilities such as encryption tools, communications, and ransom collections to independent hackers in exchange for a percentage of the collected ransom. This model has allowed ransomware attacks to be outsourced across the globe.

Is Your Business at Risk?

Who Is at Risk for an Attack?

Ransomware is a profitable business and ransom demands have escalated over the last two years. It’s no surprise that attackers are targeting large organizations who are likely to pay a ransom rather than have their business frozen for more than a day or two. Several different industries have been targeted recently including healthcare and critical infrastructure. The highly visible Colonial Pipeline attack crippled the company and the fuel supply chain on the East coast.

While large-scale ransomware attacks have made the news, there are many more that do not make national headlines. Small organizations are also at risk for an attack, especially by bots programmed to use a ‘shotgun approach’ at ransomware. These bots will scan thousands of company websites looking for email addresses, social media profiles, and any other personal data to use in a cyber attack.

Ransomware attacks are hitting close to home in Central Pennsylvania. Last year, the Duncannon borough in Perry County paid tens of thousands of dollars to hackers who held municipal data hostage. Although service was uninterrupted, the borough’s e-files, data, and emails were encrypted, and backup systems were compromised.

 

The bottom line – almost any organization is at risk for a ransomware attack. If you are a business owner, how do you reduce your risk for a cyber attack?

Start with Preparation

How to Reduce Your Risk

The best way to reduce your risk of a ransomware attack is to prepare for one. When you go through the process of preparing for a cyber attack, you will identify potential vulnerabilities and be able to address them prior to an attack.

Here are some key ways to prevent ransomware:

  • Create an incident response plan: A cybersecurity incident response plan helps companies prepare for, detect, respond to, and recover from cybersecurity incidents. The plan should address issues like malware detection, data theft, and service outages.
  • Invest in cybersecurity insurance: Cyber insurance is designed to mitigate losses from a variety of cyber incidents, including data breaches, business interruption, and network damage. It generally covers your business’ liability and helps in recovering compromised data. If you do not have cybersecurity insurance, your IT department, legal department, or your managed IT services provider can help you procure insurance.
  • Set up a secure texting channel: One of the first casualties of a cyber attack is internal communication via email. To ensure senior leadership can communicate without access to email, set up a secure texting app.
  • Use multifactor authentication (MFA): MFA is an electronic authentication process where a user is granted access to a website or application only after successfully providing two or more pieces of evidence to an authentication mechanism. MFA processes reduce the risk of ransomware since it creates an additional barrier to access of data.
  • Provide regular cybersecurity training: Most network weaknesses and cyber attacks are caused by human error. Regular cybersecurity training can drastically reduce the risk of an attack.
  • Consult with a cybersecurity company: Cybercriminals have years of training and prep to be able to be successful at what they do and one of the best ways to stay ahead of an attack is to work with a company that specializes in cybersecurity. A reputable company will help you put a plan in place to reduce your risk of an attack as well as continuously monitor your network for suspicious activity.

While no company is 100% protected from becoming a victim of ransomware, you can reduce your risk by taking proactive steps and be prepared if an attack happens.

Keeping Your Data Safe

Everound for Your Cybersecurity Needs

Everound specializes in cybersecurity best practices for small businesses to large enterprises. Our team of cybersecurity experts can help you create an incident response plan, help procure cybersecurity insurance, and implement data protection strategies and programs to keep your information and network safe.

Reach out today to start a conversation about cybersecurity for your business. We can provide a free cybersecurity risk assessment and recommend next steps to protect your data. We focus on your IT, so you can focus on your business.

While the shift to a remote workforce had been gradually evolving over the last decade, 2020 accelerated the move to remote work. Many businesses are now embracing either an entirely work-from-home culture or a hybrid model where employees split their time between an office and a remote location.

A recent survey from PwC reinforced what leaders and business owners have been hearing from their own teams – more than half of employees who were sent home to work during the pandemic prefer to continue to work from home at least 2 days a week. Nineteen percent of all employees surveyed prefer to work remotely entirely. The old paradigm of a 40-hour workweek, bookended with a morning and evening commute, is quickly changing.

The key to a successful remote workforce is a solid technology infrastructure and IT support. Technology plays a critical role in access to resources, collaboration, and most importantly, security. What current technologies can help a remote team? Let’s look at how technology supports a remote workforce.

Keeping Your Team Protected

Critical Cybersecurity for Remote Workers

A successful, efficient remote work platform requires several key technology resources that provide a seamless, secure work experience. With the staggering increase in cybercrime in 2020, the highest technology priority for any business, especially those with a remote team, is cybersecurity.

Last year more than 90% of companies worldwide experienced some form of a cyberattack whose aim was to steal passwords. For businesses with remote employees, a solid, strategically developed infrastructure can help prevent cyber threats while also providing ways for employees to work efficiently and stay connected.

Several technologies that are critical for a secure IT infrastructure include:

  • VPN: VPN, or a virtual private network, is a service that both encrypts data and hides IP addresses by bouncing network activity through a secure chain to another server miles away.
  • Network Security: Network security is the use of technologies to defend a network and network-accessible software and hardware from cyberattacks and misuse of company data. Depending on the type of business, network security can include firewalls, anti-malware, and data loss prevention (DLP).
  • Access Controls: For a remote team, access controls can help business owners allocate different levels of access to sensitive documents on a server. Access control is a security process that regulates who can view and use resources on a network. Access control minimizes risk to the business or organization and reduces the risk of a cyberthreat.
  • Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA): Multi-factor authentication is when a user must provide two or more pieces of evidence to gain access to a digital platform or resource. This extra layer of security is used to protect against hackers by ensuring that digital users are who they say they are.
Keeping Your Team Connected

Communication Technologies for a Remote Workforce

One of the challenges of the abrupt move to a remote workforce in 2020 was the immediate disruption to face-to-face communication and routine day-to-day conversations. Because nonverbal communication makes up 60-80% of communication, it’s important for businesses to integrate a visual platform for communication in addition to digital communication products (think chat programs like Slack).

Successful remote teams have several information technology resources available to them to encourage communication including:

  • Google Workspace: Google Workspace is a platform that provides several collaboration and workspace tools to make remote work easier for employees. Files can be shared on a secure platform, projects can be collaboratively edited from a central location, and communication tools that allow chatting and video and voice communication are available.
  • Microsoft Teams: Microsoft Teams is a platform that allows for instant communication, file sharing, and collaboration. Users can chat with the colleagues in real time, or even place a video phone call with one click. Files can be shared through chat, eliminating the need to send files as attachments via email. Other resources on Microsoft Teams include VOIP, screen sharing, webinars, and online meetings.
  • Video conferencing: Years ago, a video conference felt foreign to many employees. Video conferencing exploded in 2020, with several platforms breaking through as leaders. In addition to Google and Microsoft, Zoom has risen to the top with their easy-to-use platform for video conferencing. Many products can host hundreds of attendees with ease.
  • VOIP: The traditional landline phone system is becoming obsolete, especially without employees working from a shared office of location. VOIP, also known as voice over internet protocol, is a solution that connects users to each other immediately. VOIP is built in to several platforms including Zoom and Microsoft Teams.
Keeping Your Team Supported

Support Services for Remote Workers

A robust remote work program not only includes the apps and services employees need to perform their job but also supports technologies challenges and backup and disaster recovery.

Several approaches to IT support services include:

  • Remote Help Desk: When employees are working in the same building as their information technology colleagues and have an IT challenge, they often walk to their office for a quick fix to resolve issues. With remote teams, minor technology challenges can become a huge frustration without the proper process and support in place. Having a remote help desk in place with an automated help desk ticketing system provides remote employees access to technology help.
  • Backup and Disaster Recovery: While disaster recovery for on-premises infrastructure and data centers has become standard for most companies, moving applications to third-party cloud solutions to support remote work creates a unique challenge. When companies move to cloud-based applications such as file-sharing and storage, they need to do due diligence to ensure those vendors are following the best practices for disaster recovery to ensure their data is safe. Properly secured cloud-based solutions are a great way to backup and restore data in case of hard drive malfunctions, cyberattacks, and natural disasters.
We Focus On Your IT, So You Can Focus On Your Business.

Managed IT Services for a Remote Workforce

At Everound, we understand the unique information technology challenges of businesses with a remote workforce. We can help identify areas of improvement and customize solutions to help meet the needs of a fully remote or hybrid business model.
Interested in learning more? Reach out today for a free assessment to see if your current IT infrastructure is fully supporting your remote team. Let us focus on your IT, so you can focus on your business.

How fast does hardware become outdated? Let’s look at a piece of hardware almost everyone is familiar with – the iPhone. In the last five years, there have been 7 different versions released. With the average cost of an iPhone sitting at around $750, many people often skip a few generations of iPhones until they can afford the next “new” one. No big deal, right? Even the oldest model of an iPhone still makes calls and sends text messages.

 

For business IT hardware, though, (think firewalls, servers, and networking equipment), having an old, outdated version can create a risk for business owners, and hinder efficiency. If you are a small or mid-sized business owner operating on a tight budget, how do you keep your hardware up to date without a huge capital expenditure?

The answer is Hardware as a Service (HaaS).

What Is Hardware as a Service?

Hardware as a Service, or HaaS, is a procurement model that is similar to leasing or renting equipment. In the HaaS model, businesses essentially “borrow” their IT hardware from a managed service provider (MSP). The MSP owns the hardware and is responsible for maintenance and upkeep.

The service model can be set up in different ways. For some businesses, it makes sense to pay a monthly fee for the hardware, and in other cases, HaaS is incorporated into a broader managed service agreement that includes other services like help desk support and IT consulting.

 

Benefits of HaaS Solutions

In our fast-paced technology world, owning hardware can be expensive, cumbersome, and challenging for business owners. HaaS offers an alternative approach to hardware and IT infrastructure needs that can help business owners reduce the stress of keeping up with how quickly technology changes.

There are several ways HaaS can benefit businesses including:  

  • Low, Upfront Costs: One of the biggest advantages of HaaS is there are no large capital expenditures for a business owner. Businesses do not have to spend a lot of money to provide the most up-to-date IT infrastructure for their business. This is especially beneficial for startups and small businesses that do not have a hefty budget for hardware. HaaS essentially turns a large capital expense into a more manageable operating expense. 
  • Staying Current: One major benefit of HaaS is that the MSP keeps hardware equipment current with the latest technology. When a new version of a particular technology arrives, the MSP oversees updating it for the business owner. HaaS clients do not have to stress over investing in tech that might become obsolete quickly after purchase. The MSP is incentivized to make sure their client has the best and latest equipment. 
  • Worry-Free Maintenance: When businesses opt for HaaS with an MSP, the responsibility for the maintenance and upkeep shifts to the MSP, not the business owner. Since the MSP owns the equipment, they will provide not only the hardware itself but also provide routine service and maintenance as part of the HaaS agreement. Business owners can forget about expired warranties and potential equipment failures – the MSP takes care of making sure everything is working and operating at peak performance. 
  • Tighter Security: When it comes to cybersecurity, new is often better. Cybercriminals are a savvy group and are constantly working on new ways to access businesses’ sensitive data. Not only are they targeting software, but they are also targeting vulnerable, outdated hardware. With HaaS, it is easy to upgrade to the latest hardware technology designed to create optimal endpoint security. 
  • Scalability: HaaS often makes the most sense for small and medium businesses that are on a growth plan. As businesses grow, their technology needs also grow with them. When growing businesses add new employees, expand their service offerings for their clients, or add additional office locations, they need to invest in their technology infrastructure to meet their business goals. HaaS helps businesses scale efficiently as they grow.

Everound: Your Hardware as a Service Partner

At Everound, we understand the challenges businesses face with keeping their hardware operating at a level that meets and exceeds their business goals. We offer both HaaS as an independent service and as part of a monthly managed IT services plan. Our HaaS packages can be customized to meet the specific needs of a business and often includes:

  • Firewalls: Firewalls are a line of defense against security threats, and one of the last pieces of equipment business owners think of when purchasing or upgrading IT hardware. With HaaS, Everound provides the latest firewall solutions to help prevent cyber threats.
  • Servers: A server is a central piece of hardware in a computer network that stores, sends, and receives data. It provides functionality for the entire IT infrastructure of a business. Through HaaS, Everound offers servers either on-site or in the cloud, depending on need.
  • Wi-Fi or networking equipment: Wi-Fi and networking equipment includes devices such as network switches and access points. Everound can help your business stay connected and online with Wi-Fi and networking equipment.  
  • Battery backups: Battery backup and smart surge protection devices, such as Wattboxes, can help protect your business from downtime. Power and electricity outages, surges, and brownouts can be prevented with minimal investment. These can cause data loss and physical damage to your computer components.

Curious if Hardware as a Service is right for your business? Reach out today to learn more about how we can help. Let us focus on your IT needs so you can focus on your business.

As a business owner, you are likely familiar with and utilize antivirus (AV) software to help protect your hardware devices from cyber threats.

While antivirus programs provide basic protection from threats, the technology has been relatively unchanged since its inception in the late 1980s and can easily be bypassed by today’s savvy cybercriminals.

Antivirus programs are not enough to protect you from advanced threats like ransomware. Ransomware works much differently than traditional viruses and can attack your data and hold them hostage with encryption. Ransomware attacks cost businesses nearly $20 billion in 2020 alone.

So how do you fully protect your business from cyber threats including ransomware and malware? While nothing is completely infallible, implementing an endpoint detection and response (EDR) solution can protect your company from advanced threats.

What is Endpoint Detection and Response?

Endpoint detection and response is a cloud-based continuous monitoring cyber software platform designed to find and mitigate cyber threats that have bypassed your existing cybersecurity measures.

Think of endpoint detection and response, also referred to as endpoint threat detection and response (ETDR), as a cyber threat “hunter” and antivirus, as a cyber threat “roadblock” or “obstacle.” Sophisticated malware like ransomware can overcome a roadblock or obstacle, so “threat hunting” with EDR adds an additional layer of cybersecurity. If a threat infiltrates your antivirus software, EDR takes over.

How Does Endpoint Detection and Response Work?

EDR software such as SentinelOne is installed on endpoints and records every file execution, registry change, network connection, and other activities in a central database. Every action taken on endpoints is monitored and recorded. Then, using machine learning, EDR provides real-time data and threat intelligence on and between the endpoints.

EDR investigates the entire lifespan of the threat. EDR will determine how the threat bypassed the initial cybersecurity system (usually the antivirus software), where it has been in the environment, what it’s doing now, and how to eliminate it.

Using this data, EDR contains the threat and prevents it from spreading throughout your entire network. EDR uses analytics to find patterns and anomalies in an environment including rare processes, strange connections, and related risky activities.

System administrators can access the data compiled by the EDR in a central dashboard, and users that have suspicious activity on their endpoint will be notified of the threat in real-time.

EDR Capabilities

While many EDR programs have varying security capabilities, they share key components and features. When searching for an EDR solution, here are key capabilities to look for:

Detection

Cyber threat and incident detection are critical to a successful endpoint detection and response program. EDR uses continual file analysis to determine if any malicious behavior is unfolding. When identified, an EDR solution will flag the file as suspicious so immediate action can be taken.

Containment

After detecting an issue, an EDR solution will immediately contain the threat. If left alone, the threat can spread quickly throughout a network, creating chaos, and potentially infecting and harming other endpoints. Quick containment can save companies thousands of dollars in lost revenue, ransom, and downtime.

Investigation

What sets EDR apart from traditional antivirus is its ability to investigate the cause of the threat, document its behavior, and then use that information to improve upon existing security protocols. For example, if the threat slipped through the front-line barriers, there is clearly a vulnerable point-of-entry in the network. The EDR will help you find that vulnerability and remediate it.

Elimination

An EDR solution will efficiently and effectively remove the identified threat and scan the network for similar suspicious files that may have infiltrated the system. Using compiled data and best practices in cybersecurity, the threat is eliminated, and preventative measures are put in place to prevent the threat from replicating.

Why EDR Is Important for Businesses in 2021

Cybercrime rose a staggering 300+% in 2020, most notably after the abrupt transition to a remote workforce in the spring. The increase occurred mostly at companies that were using antiquated antivirus software without an EDR solution in place.

With remote work extending into at least the first few quarters in 2021, it’s important to take proactive measures to reduce the risk of cyber threats and attacks. Even if your workforce isn’t remote, EDR can help keep your company endpoints safe from a cyber threat.

Originally adopted by large enterprise businesses, EDR is now recommended for businesses of all sizes to avoid and mitigate a cyber attack. An effective EDR can protect businesses from losing thousands of dollars in lost revenue and critical hours of downtime.

Everound and SentinelOne: Your EDR Security Team

Everound partners with SentinelOne, a national, leading EDR solution, to implement affordable endpoint detection and response programs for both small and enterprise-level businesses. Nearly all data breaches occur at endpoints, so having a proper EDR solution in place is critical to keeping your business operating at peak efficiency in a safe cyber environment.

As endpoint protection platform (EPP) experts, Everound can help your business implement a comprehensive EDR solution at a reasonable investment. Reach out today for a free consultation, and to learn more about how we can help keep your IT safe, so you can focus on your core business.